Porsche is proud to present our model overview for 2003. This model-year, we've updated the Boxster and Boxster S, giving them their first updates since their introductions. The North American introduction of the Cayenne S and Cayenne Turbo will occur in early 2003. The 911 line-up remains unchanged, with most updates occurring in 2002. Below is a brief overview of the current Porsche models, as well as the Cayenne S and Cayenne Turbo and 911 GT3.

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The 911 GT3 represents the most powerful non-turbocharged Porsche ever offered
for street use in the United States and Canada.

Based on the previous 911 GT3 that was not available in North America, the 2004 Porsche® 911 GT3 features a 3.6-liter, flat- six cylinder engine producing 380 horsepower (SAE) and 285 pound-feet of torque. With a power output of an impressive 105 horsepower per liter, the engine propels the 911 GT3 from 0 to 60 mph in 4.3 seconds, from 0 to 100 mph in 9.4 seconds, and to a top track speed of 190 mph. To handle this increased performance, the 911 GT3’s transmission is fitted with transmission oil cooling and injection oil lubrication and has undergone some additional reinforcements.

The most striking visual feature of the new 911 GT3 is its unique rear wing that is largely responsible for excellent directional stability at high speeds and increased downforce for fast cornering. Combining a redesigned front apron, the GT3 achieves an outstanding drag coefficient (Cd=0.30) for a car in its class.

The GT3’s handling is further enhanced by a sports suspension, wider and lighter wheels, and wider tires. Front wheels are 8.5 inches wide fitted with 235/40 ZR 18 tires, and rear wheels are 11 inches wide with 295/30 ZR 18 tires.

Brakes on the GT3 have been improved as well. Front brakes now feature six-piston, rather than the previous four-piston monobloc brake calipers and larger discs fitted with Porsche-patented cooling ducts. The ABS brake system was also modified. The new system (ABS 5.7) has a faster and more sensitive control response. It is also lightweight and provides greater stability for ABS braking. Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB®) discs, standard on the 911 GT2, can be fitted on request.


The 911® is now. The 2003 Boxster® and Boxster S are new. And next: The Porsche® Cayenne, the third Porsche and the first true sport utility vehicle (SUV).

The Cayenne takes its name from the very hot red pepper that is recognized around the world as a symbol for zestful spiciness.

Production plans for the Cayenne were announced in the summer of 1998, when it also was announced that the Porsche SUV would have permanent four-wheel drive and true off-road capability while maintaining Porsche standards for ride and handling.

While the Cayenne’s engines were designed at Porsche’s Research and Development Center in Weissach, Germany, and will be built in the Porsche factory at Zuffenhausen, the Porsche SUV will be assembled in a brand new factory located in historic Leipzig, Germany.

Taking the Porsche experience to a new level, the Cayenne is designed to create a perfect balance of performance and power, delivering an optimum blend of supreme on-pavement and equally outstanding off-pavement driving qualities. The car is to make its international debut in late 2002.

The Cayenne will be introduced in two versions, the Cayenne S and the Cayenne Turbo.

A 4.5-liter V8 engine rated at 340 horsepower (DIN) and 310 pound-feet of torque will power the Cayenne S. It will accelerate from a standing start to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 7.2 seconds on its way to a top test-track speed of 150 mph (242 km/h).

The Cayenne Turbo will be powered by a twin-turbocharged version of the 4.5-liter V8. The boosted engine will provide an incredible 450 horsepower (DIN) and 460 pound-feet of torque. The Cayenne Turbo will accelerate from 0 to 62 mph (100 km/h) in only 5.6 seconds and can achieve a top test-track speed of 165 mph (266 km/h).

The Cayenne S and Cayenne Turbo will feature a new six-speed Tiptronic® S automatic transmission as standard equipment.

Both Cayenne models will have permanent four-wheel drive, an inter-axle d i ff e rential lock and additional low-range gears, the Porsche Stability Management (PSM) system, and the capability to tow 7,716 pounds (3,500 kilograms). Both will ride on wheels that range from 18 inches to 20 inches in diameter.




Lighter and more powerful than the 911 Turbo on which it is based, the Porsche 911 GT2 is the ultimate Porsche model for 2003. With 456 horsepower (SAE), the GT2 can accelerate from a standing start to 62 mph (100 km/h) in about four seconds and can achieve a top speed of 195 mph (315 km/h) on the test track.

The biggest weight saving over the 911 Turbo is achieved by making the GT2 a rear-wheel drive sports car (the 911 Turbo is all-wheel drive). Other weight-saving measures include fitting sport seats in front and deleting the rear seats and replacing the spare tire with a tire repair kit which includes a bottle of sealing foam, an air compressor and a pressure gauge.

The 911 GT2 is the first Porsche to be fitted as standard with the Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB®). The ceramic composite discs weigh 50-percent less than comparable metal discs, reducing unsprung weight by a significant 36.6 lb. (16.6 kg) and thus enhancing suspension response.

In addition to weighing more than 200 pounds less than the 911 Turbo, the 911 GT2 has a more powerful version of Porsche’s 3.6-liter twin-turbo six-cylinder “boxer” engine. For the 911 Turbo, the twin turbochargers boost airflow into the engine to 11.76 psi. But for the 911 GT2, those turbochargers spin 14.5 psi into the engine. The GT2 engine produces 456 horsepower at 5,700 rpm and sustained 457 lb.-ft of peak torque from 3,500-4,500 rpm.

The only transmission available is a modified version of the 911 Turbo six-speed manual. A special asymmetric limited-slip differential helps stabilize the car in curves under load changes.

Compared to the 911 Turbo, redesigned air intake scoops provide additional cooling air. Porsche also refined the GT2’s aerodynamic characteristics to produce greater downforce. A one-piece fixed-design rear wing replaces the two-piece automatic-deploying spoiler of the 911 Turbo and allows six degrees adjustment for racetrack driving.

The GT2 also benefits from chassis modifications that come directly from Porsche’s road racing experience. Suspension modifications include racing springs that lower the center of gravity by 0.78-inch (20 mm), adjustable anti-roll bars and a wide range of suspension adjustment to accommodate racing tires. The front alloy wheels measure 18 x 8.5-inch and mount 235/40 ZR18 tires. The rear alloy wheels measure 18 x 12-inch and mount 315/30 ZR18 tires.

The GT2 retains all current Porsche safety technology, including dual front airbags plus the Porsche Side Impact Protection System, which includes boron-steel door reinforcement beams, energy-absorbing door panels and door-mounted side airbags. The 30-liter capacity sidebags provide additional protection for the chest, head, and pelvis.

Although the 911 GT2 deletes some of the luxury content from the 911 Turbo, its standard equipment includes power windows and an anti-theft system with transponder key, immobilizer, alarm plus central locking with remote entry. The GT2 has a standard digital radio with in-dash CD player. Automatic climate control and cruise control and natural leather trim are available as options.


The 2003 Porsche 911 Turbo continues a performance legend begun when the first 911 Turbo was introduced to North America in 1976. With a 415-horsepower (SAE) twin-turbo engine and advanced all-wheel drive, the latest 911 Turbo takes its place in the top echelon of the supercar category.

Derived from the Porsche GT1 racecar, the 3.6-liter, horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine sustains 415 lb.-ft. of peak torque from 2,700-4,600 rpm. In place of a conventional throttle cable setup, the E-Gas electronic throttle transmits pedal position to the engine control unit.

Power drives through a standard six-speed manual transmission. The advanced Tiptronic® S five-speed automatic transmission is available as an option.

The 911 Turbo can accelerate from 0-62 mph (0-100 kph) in just 4.2 seconds. On the test track, the 911 Turbo can sprint from a standstill to 100 mph (160 kph) in only 9.2 seconds and achieve a top speed of 189 mph (305 km/h).

An optional engine enhancement performance package increases the twin-turbo engine’s output to 444 horsepower (SAE) and 457 lb.-ft of torque.

The standard Porsche Stability Management system (PSM) can detect a loss of grip at the front or rear and reduce instability by applying braking to individual wheels and, if necessary, altering engine power.

The upper part of the two-piece rear stabilizer wing automatically rises at speeds above 75 mph (120 kph) and lowers at speeds below 50 mph (80 km/h).

The standard aluminum hollow-spoke alloy wheels measure 18 x 8 inches in front and mount 225/40 ZR18 tires; the 18 x 11-inch rear wheels mount 295/30 ZR18 tires. Also derived from the GT1 racecar, one-piece, four-piston monobloc brake calipers reduce unsprung weight and heat and feature 13-inch (330-mm) vented, cross-drilled discs front and rear.

Standard Bi-Xenon headlight clusters feature xenon high-intensity discharge headlights for both the low and high beams.




The 2003 Porsche Carrera 4S combines the 3.6-liter, 315-horsepower (SAE) Carrera engine with the body, all-wheel drive chassis and feature content of the 911 Turbo, with only some minor design detail differences between the two models:

The front spoiler differs slightly; the Carrera 4S retains the automatic-deploying rear spoiler from the 911 Carrera instead of the Turbo’s two-piece wing; the Carrera 4S deletes the Turbo’s side intake ducts because these are only required to supply air to the turbo intercoolers; the C4S gets its own glass-reinforced plastic rear decklid with a reflector strip connecting the taillights.

The 3.6-liter engine – also shared with the 911 Carrera, Carrera Cabriolet, Carrera 4 Cabriolet and 911 Targa – produces 273 lb.-ft. of peak torque at 4,250 rpm, with at least 236 lb.-ft. available from 2,500-7,000 rpm. The engine uses VarioCam® Plus valve timing and lift system adapted from the 911 Turbo to help boost torque.

The 911 Carrera 4S can accelerate from zero-to-62 mph (100 km/h) in 5.1 seconds. A six-speed manual transmission is standard. The advanced Tiptronic® S five-speed automatic, which allows manual control, is available as an option. The all-wheel drive system uses a viscous multi-plate clutch mounted behind the front differential, sending five-to-40 percent of available torque forward depending on traction and power applied.

The standard solid-spoke aluminum alloy Turbo wheels measure 18 x 8 inches in front and mount 225/40 ZR18 tires; the 18 x 11-inch rear wheels mount 295/30 ZR18 tires. The Carrera 4S shares the 911 Turbo suspension and 13-inch vented, cross-drilled four-wheel disc brakes.

The standard Porsche Stability Management system (PSM) can detect a loss of grip at the front or rear and reduce instability by applying braking to individual wheels and, if necessary, altering engine power.

Safety technology includes a patented crumple-zone body structure, new seatbelt pretensioners and load limiters, dual front airbags, door-mounted side airbags, and anti-lock brakes (ABS).

The 911 Carrera 4S shares the additional standard luxury content of the 911 Turbo, which includes fully power-adjustable leather seats for the driver and passenger (with driver’s side memory), programmable remote entry and security system with alarm and immobilizer, and a digital audio system with an in-dash CD player.

As on the Turbo, the 911 Carrera 4S offers metallic paint choices at no extra cost.




The Porsche 911 Targa expands on the concept of the previous model (1996-1997), which introduced a large power-operated sliding glass roof that slides under the rear window.

The Targa’s glass roof offers a sky view through more than 16 square feet (1.5 square meters) of glass.

Operated by two silent electric motors, the 911 Targa’s sliding roof panel opens the roof by nearly 20 inches (0.5 m), providing an opening of nearly 700 sq. inches (0.45 sq. m.), nearly twice the size of the sunroof opening in the 911 Carrera Coupe. A wind deflector reduces turbulence, and a cloth sunblind automatically extends out beneath the roof panel when closed.

A hinged rear glass panel provides convenient access to the rear luggage compartment, which offers 8.1 cubic feet of space (230 liters), compared to 7.1 cu. ft. (210 l.) in the 911 Carrera® Coupe.

The first 911 Targa, named for the Sicilian Targa Florio road race (1906-1973), came to North America in 1967. The original 911 Targa presented a truly innovative approach to open-air motoring with its often-imitated removable roof panel design. Popularity of the 911 Cabriolet through the 1980s and 1990s led Porsche to design the sliding-glass roof concept for the new 911 Targa.

While previous Targas were based on the body architecture of a convertible, this newest generation is built on the 911 Carrera Coupe platform, bringing additional strength and structure for superior rigidity.

All 911 models have a strengthened body structure, and the 911 Targa adds a unique upper body structure with specially reinforced A-pillars and roof rails. Additional safety technology includes a patented crumple-zone body structure, seatbelt pretensioners and load limiters, dual front airbags, door-mounted side airbags, and anti-lock brakes (ABS).

The optional Porsche Stability Management system (PSM) can detect a loss of grip at the front or rear and reduce instability by applying braking to individual wheels and, if necessary, altering engine power.

The 911 Targa shares its Turbo-inspired styling and 315-horsepower (SAE), 3.6-liter engine with the 911 Carrera Coupe and Cabriolet, 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet and 911 Carrera 4S models.

Porsche’s patented VarioCam® Plus valve timing and lift system boosts torque to 273 lb.-ft. at 4,250 with at least 236 lb.-ft available from 2,500-7,000 rpm. The 911 Targa can accelerate from zero-to-62 mph (100 km/h) in 5.2 seconds.


Porsche’s primary models are the 911 Carrera Coupe and the 911 Carrera Cabriolet, and both underwent significant enhancements in 2002. The changes included a larger and more powerful engine, a strengthened body structure and exterior styling changes inspired by the awesome 911 Turbo. That Turbo look included a new headlight design, reshaped front end, widened rear quarter panels and redesigned oval exhaust tailpipes.

About all that was left that needed tweaking for 2003 was the installation of a new standard digital AM/FM radio featuring an in-dash CD player.

A 3.6-liter, horizontally opposed “boxer” engine that produces 315 horsepower (SAE) and 273 lb.-ft. of torque powers the 911 Coupe and Cabriolet. The engine uses the Porsche-patented VarioCam® Plus valve timing and lift system similar to that used on the 911 Turbo. One result of this innovation is a broad torque curve that provides enhanced response at all speeds.

The Cabriolet features a fully automatic power roof with an automatic deploying supplemental safety bar structure. The convertible top has a glass rear window with integrated defroster.

Safety technology includes a patented crumple-zone body structure, dual front airbags, door-mounted side airbags and anti-lock brakes (ABS). The Porsche Stability Management System (PSM) is optional.

Porsche’s all-wheel-drive convertible underwent significant enhancements last year, including a larger and more powerful engine, strengthened body structure and a new look inspired by the awesome 911 Turbo. That Turbo look included a new headlight design, reshaped front end, widened rear quarter panels and redesigned oval exhaust tailpipes.

The 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet provides the confidence and stability of all-wheel drive. Power goes to the front wheels through a viscous multi-plate clutch mounted just behind the front differential. The Porsche Stability Management System (PSM) further enhances the car’s amazing handling, which is standard equipment on this model. PSM can detect a loss of grip at the front or rear and reduce instability by applying braking to individual wheels and, if necessary, altering engine power.

Safety technology includes a patented crumple-zone body structure, dual front airbags, door-mounted side airbags, and anti-lock brakes (ABS).


The Boxster is a mid-engine roadster that takes its name from the union of Porsche’s classic, horizontally opposed six-cylinder “boxer” engine architecture with a roadster body. In the case of the Boxster, that body echoes such famous mid-engine Porsche sports and racing cars as the 550 Spyder and the RS60.

The Boxster was unveiled as a stunning concept car at the North American International Auto Show at Detroit in January 1993. After an overwhelmingly positive response from around the world -- and an extensive period of development and testing -- Porsche put its newest sports car into series production as a 1997 model.

Ever since the Boxster’s launch, the car has undergone continual enhancements. Those updates truly accelerate for 2003 with a more powerful engine, a new top with a glass window and a wider range of standard equipment.

New front and rear fascia improve the car’s appearance as well as its performance efficiency. Performance is enhanced even more with the availability of new light-alloy wheels that reduce unsprung weight.

New VarioCam® technology and Motronic ME 7.8 engine management software increase the output of the Boxster’s 2.7-liter engine and also make the engine more fuel-efficient while reducing exhaust emissions. Horsepower increases to 225 horsepower (SAE) at 6,300 rpm (compared to 217 horsepower for the 2002 model). The engine’s torque figure remains 192 pound-feet at 4,750 rpm.

The 2003 Boxster can accelerate from a standing start to 100 km/h (62 mph) in only 6.4 seconds, an improvement of two-tenths of a second over the 2002 model. But even with this improved performance, the Boxster gets better fuel mileage. For 2003, its EPA figures are 20 mpg in the city and 29 on the highway (compared to respective numbers of 19 and 27 in 2002) and 11.7 liter/100km and 7.4 for Canada. Those figures are for a Boxster with its standard five-speed manual transmission; the Tiptronic® S transmission is available and also shows performance improvements for the 2003 model year.

Refinements to the car’s styling contribute to these improved performance figures and also provide the Boxster with an even more contemporary -- and more 911®-like -- appearance.

The lower section of the roadster’s face has been refined with enhanced side air intakes and a subtle redesign and extension of the front lip. These changes improve airflow through and around the car.

The redesigned convertible top has a fourth support bracket and a glass window with an electric defroster. The top still goes up or down in only 12 seconds, but its revised shape allows improved airflow to a redesigned rear spoiler that emerges from the car’s rear deck at 75 mph (120 km/h) and retracts at 50 mph (80 km/h).

The side-mounted air scoops that feed cooling air to the Boxster’s engine have been redesigned for improved efficiency and also have body-colored grids.

The rear section of the car gets new turn indicator light covers and a redesigned exhaust pipe that is flanked by thin but wide vents that enhance the car’s appearance while also providing more cooling airflow around the exhaust system. For 2003 the Boxster gets the same shock absorbers as the Boxster S model, and the car’s performance can be further enhanced by the availability of new optional wheels. The Boxster comes with standard 16-inch wheels, but a new, optional 17-inch wheel is more than half a pound lighter than the 17-inch wheel that was available on the 2002 model. Also optional for 2003 is an 18-inch
light-alloy wheel previously available on the 911 Carrera. This wheel reduces unsprung weight by nearly six pounds per wheel compared to the 18-inch wheel available in 2002.

Also new for the 2003 model year is Porsche’s new Communication Management system (PCM) that incorporates tuners, CD player, navigation system and trip computer, all connected to each other through the new Media-Oriented Systems Transport (MOST) digital databus.

Completing the subtle but significant changes for the Boxster for 2003 are the addition of such standard features as a new, 911-style cupholder that pops out of the dashboard, remote unlocking front and rear trunks as well as the passenger doors, and a lighted and locking glove compartment. The air-conditioner and heat controls have been moved from the console to the dash for easier accessibility and use, and instead of black leather, the steering wheel, gearshift lever, door handles and handbrake lever are trimmed in the same color leather as the rest of the interior.

The Boxster continues to provide such safety technology as its patented crumple-zone body structure, inertia-reel three-point seatbelts with pretensioners and load limiters, dual front airbags, door-mounted side airbags and anti-lock brakes. Boron steel tubing reinforcements around the windshield and supplemental safety bars behind the seats help provide protection in rollover accidents. The Porsche Stability Management system (PSM) is available as an option.

The Boxster’s unique combination of safety, performance and its additional new features for 2003 make the roadster an ideal sports car for everyday driving.


The Boxster S model is an even higher performance version of the Porsche Boxster. It has an exclusive 3.2-liter “boxer” six-cylinder engine, a standard six-speed manual ransmission, more athletic suspension tuning, an additional front air intake and a third radiator, standard 17-inch wheels and larger brakes. The exterior has distinctive titanium-colored trim and the interior features unique gauges and trim.

Like the Boxster, the Boxster S has been enhanced for the 2003 model year with a variety of significant new features. Changes in its VarioCam® variable valve timing technology and new Motronic ME 7.8 engine management software system enable the 3.2-liter “boxer” to generate an amazing 258 horsepower (SAE) at 6,200 rpm. The 2002 model provided 250 horsepower (SAE).

The torque rating is 229 lb.-ft., with a beefy torque curve that provides 85 percent of peak power at only 2,000 rpm, assuring the Boxster S of outstanding response even at low speeds.

To handle such power, the standard six-speed manual transmission has been upgraded with revisions to its single-plate drive clutch.

Thanks to its more powerful engine and revised transmission, the Boxster S accelerates from a standing start to 100 km/h (62 mph) in only 5.7 seconds, a figure that is two-tenths of a second quicker than the 2002 Boxster S. But even with such impressive power figures, fuel economy figures have improved.

Like the 2003 Boxster, the 2003 Boxster S has a new top with a glass window and a wider range of standard equipment. New front and rear fascia improve the appearance and the aerodynamic efficiency of the Boxster S. Along with its revised front and rear fascias, the Boxster S also has redesigned twin exhaust pipes.

The high-performance roadster also gets new rear stabilizer bars that are longer (19 mm vs. 18.5 last year) and thicker (2.7 mm vs. 2.5).

The car’s already amazing performance can be enhanced even more through the availability of new light-alloy wheels that reduce unsprung weight. The new standard 17-inch wheels reduce unsprung weight by more than half a pound at each corner. The new, optional 18-inch wheels cut nearly 24 pounds of unsprung weight from the vehicle, a remarkable 22 percent reduction that directly results in more responsive handling.

Also new for the 2003 model year are Porsche’s new Communication Management systems (PCM) that incorporates tuners, CD player, navigation system and trip computer, all connected to each other through the new Media-Oriented Systems Transport (MOST) digital databus.

The Boxster S continues to provide such safety technology as its patented crumple-zone body structure, inertia-reel three-point seatbelts with pretensioners and load limiters, dual front airbags, door-mounted side airbags and anti-lock brakes. Boron steel tubing reinforcements around the windshield and supplemental safety bars behind the seats help provide protection in rollover accidents. The Porsche Stability Management (PSM) system is available as an option.

This unique combination of safety, performance and the additional new features for 2003 makes the Boxster S the ideal roadster for everyday driving by enthusiasts who want the ultimate edge in performance potential.

Click here for 2003 Pricing Information

For more information, contact: Bob Carlson (770) 290-3676 or Jody Scott (770) 290-3764


© 2002 Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG. Legal notice.